RECENT WORK


SHORT FICTION

Neon Barbie / Peach Mag / 2019

“One day, on the bus, Jessica Mae hands me a small damp envelope containing an invitation to her birthday party. When I get home I can’t wait to tell Mom the bad news.
She thinks it’s wonderful.”

*

The See-Through / Smirk Magazine / 2018

“It's 10am and it's already hot hot hot. We burn ourselves on the aluminum benches, but soon the skin of our own legs cools the metal until it is comfortable to sit on. We once tried sitting in the shade below the bleachers, but the grass there is too high, where the town lawn mowers can't reach and where it's littered with wrappers, cigarette butts, empty cans, and bottles - things discarded by the parents of little league players.
Look, says Paula.
This better be good, I think, after all that riding around.
And it is.”


MEMOIR

AFTER:WORDS

In her series AFTER:WORDS Bowen re-examines her archive of personal journals and photographs, merging them, with the magic of hindsight, to create succinct representations of real events and experiences of her past.

From AFTER:WORDS (Day 10,874), Our Last Day in Amsterdam, page 1 of 10

From AFTER:WORDS (Day 10,874), Our Last Day in Amsterdam, page 1 of 10

From AFTER:WORDS (Day 10,874), Our Last Day in Amsterdam, page 2 of 10

From AFTER:WORDS (Day 10,874), Our Last Day in Amsterdam, page 2 of 10

From AFTER:WORDS (Day 11,718), At the Lake with my Parents

“Back then we still emptied the contents of our suitcases into drawers
But now we live out of our bags, instead
Because we know that time is nothing
And that the week will end in just a few days”


*

It’s Been a Long Time

In this collection of stories about ‘Nonna’, Bowen merges her own account with her grandmother’s, as well as historical research, to create a narrative of one life that is part memory, part magic. This is an ongoing project.

Elsa and Eddie met on a boat, somewhere in the middle of the Atlantic. Below them was five miles of dark briny water, and above them sixty-two miles of atmospheric gases. Seventy-eight parts nitrogen, to twenty-one parts oxygen, to one part argon, mostly. And beyond that was all of the stars and planets, and an endless expanse of celestial stuff, which they would spend almost no time at all considering. Because at such a moment in time, in May of 1951, on a passenger ship called Laguardia, in the middle of the Atlantic, there were only two directions one was inclined to look - forward or back.

“Nonna opens the door.
She says, Look who it is!
As if she knows.
She ushers me in, It’s been a long time!
It hasn’t.”